Seeking a better past: Hilary Mantel’s Reith Lectures

This guest post on Hilary Mantel's Reith Lectures comes from Laura Tisdall. History is about the probable, whereas historical fiction is about the possible. Or is this too tidy? In the fourth of her Reith lectures [1], Hilary Mantel spoke about the problems that can be created when historical fiction diverges from historical fact, citing … Continue reading Seeking a better past: Hilary Mantel’s Reith Lectures

Final Programme for #CreativeHistories17

We are very excited to unveil the Creative Histories Final Programme for 'Creative Histories' at Bristol Zoo, 19th-21st July. We've been overwhelmed by the energy and interest in the event, and are really pleased to be able to present a programme that features a range of performances, talks, exhibitions, and workshops. In a zoo. There … Continue reading Final Programme for #CreativeHistories17

Creative Histories 2017, Bristol

We are delighted to announce that the programme for ‘Creative Histories’ in Bristol 19th-21st July has now gone live. The events include a performance from the singer-songwriter Darren Hayman, who will play songs from his recent ‘Thankful Villages’ project, and talks from Julia Blackburn, author of Threads and Thin Paths, and Professor Ronald Hutton, historian and trustee of … Continue reading Creative Histories 2017, Bristol

Next Book: Matt Houlbrook’s Prince of Tricksters

The next book for the #storypast online discussion will be Matt Houlbrook's Prince of Tricksters, described by the Times Higher Education as 'an intriguing account not only of a con man, but of the social milieu that enabled him to thrive'. Houlbrook's book combines meticulous research with imaginative and creative techniques, shifting from narrative prose into more unusual … Continue reading Next Book: Matt Houlbrook’s Prince of Tricksters

Jennifer Sinor’s The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing

When my Great Aunt Norah's diaries fell into my lap, I knew in an instant that I was peering into a new world. It wasn't just her world, the C20th seen through Norah's eyes, recorded every evening for 72 years in her neatly rounded hand. It felt almost otherworldly. To feel my way through, some … Continue reading Jennifer Sinor’s The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing

Absence in Women’s Lifewriting

In this guest post, Jennifer Sinor of Utah State University writes about how and why she came to write The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing, her book about her great, great, great Aunt Annie Ray and the diary she kept. We will be reading Sinor's fascinating book and discussing it on the #storypast hashtag on Twitter on … Continue reading Absence in Women’s Lifewriting

Next Book: Jennifer Sinor ‘The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing’

The next book for the #storypast online discussion will be Jennifer Sinor's The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing. We will be discussing this on Thursday 2nd February 1-2pm. Blurb from University of Iowa Press: “Jennifer Sinor articulates complex and intriguing arguments about the 'making of ordinary writing' in a style that is both imminently accessible and yet … Continue reading Next Book: Jennifer Sinor ‘The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing’

Adam Thorpe’s Ulverton

The next book for the online discussion group #storypast is Adam Thorpe's Ulverton (1992), an extraordinary novel about an English village, told over three hundred years by twelve of its inhabitants. We'll be discussing the novel on twitter via our hashtag #storypast on Thursday 3 November, 1-2pm GMT but you can use the hashtag before … Continue reading Adam Thorpe’s Ulverton