Erika Hanna, ‘The Politics of Creativity’

What are the politics of creative histories? Are they radical or conservative? Across the three days of the conference I really enjoyed listening to the huge wealth of research and expertise, and discovering new and beautiful histories which often displayed a disarming novelty and sensitivity. But I really wanted to think through the question of … Continue reading Erika Hanna, ‘The Politics of Creativity’

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Cheryl Morgan, ‘The Objectivity Trap’

In the wrap up session for Creative Histories we talked quite a lot about the question, “Who gets to be creative?”, writes Cheryl Morgan. That is obviously a major issue for the conference, but from my point of view a more pressing question is, “Who gets to do history?” That’s important because it can determine … Continue reading Cheryl Morgan, ‘The Objectivity Trap’

Kate Summerscale in conversation 26th January 2018

We are very excited to announce that as part of the series of events in 2017-8 on the theme of 'Creative Histories', the author Kate Summerscale will be appearing live in conversation. And we are looking for questions from you! What would you most like to know about writing historical creative non-fiction? We welcome any … Continue reading Kate Summerscale in conversation 26th January 2018

John Reeks, ‘Creative History Needs a Better Name’

I’m not lying: no, this is a creative history. I went to this conference believing that ‘creative history’ is a contradiction in terms: I remain firmly convinced of that view, writes John Reeks. By definition, creativity requires outside-of-the-box thinking and a willingness to tear up the rulebook. History, meanwhile, is a rules-based discipline. Historians are bound … Continue reading John Reeks, ‘Creative History Needs a Better Name’

Lucie Dutton, ‘Maurice Elvey, a Film about Nelson and Quilting my Research’

In 1918, British director Maurice Elvey made a film about Admiral Lord Nelson, a film he had planned for five years. My research into this film and its production history led to a series of quite unexpected quilting projects, which are described on my blog: http://www.isthereroomformetosew.com I’ve been researching Elvey for the last decade, as … Continue reading Lucie Dutton, ‘Maurice Elvey, a Film about Nelson and Quilting my Research’

Anthony Rhys, ‘Upset Victorians’

I’m Anthony Rhys and I paint upset Victorians. I put together a cross-section of my paintings for the Creative Histories Conference. It’s made me think about the links between my art and history and definitions of creative history. I must confess I have an A-level in history (I think I got a B), a degree … Continue reading Anthony Rhys, ‘Upset Victorians’

Lito Apostolakou, ‘Creative Menagerie’

As a historian who has practised the art of research, yielded to the allure of the archive, endured the tyranny of the footnote, and experienced the pleasure of the documented argument and the crafting of a coherent narrative, I do not wield the authority of an academic position, writes Lito Apostolakou. If I was once … Continue reading Lito Apostolakou, ‘Creative Menagerie’

Ed Rowan, ‘A Few Thoughts from a Non-academic’

There was much going on inside and around the Clifton Pavilion, and I spent at least as much time navigating the spaces between the scheduled events as anything else, writes Ed Rowan. The events I could attend helped with a few ideas I’d taken with me, as well as offering some impressions that I wasn’t … Continue reading Ed Rowan, ‘A Few Thoughts from a Non-academic’

Ghislaine Peart, ‘The Benefits of Creativity’

What are the benefits of a creative approach to history, asks Ghislaine Peart? To answer this question, we must first consider another – namely, what do we mean by history? The definition of the ancient Greek word ἱστορία, whence our modern word derives, is instructive. ἱστορία, ἡ inquiry knowledge so obtained, information written account of … Continue reading Ghislaine Peart, ‘The Benefits of Creativity’

Sally Rodgers, ‘Better Ways in: Using Creative History to Engage New Audiences in Tinsley, South Yorkshire’

Four days after returning from ‘Creative Histories’ we ran a family arts day in a community building, writes Sally Rodgers. The event was full of activities inspired by Tinsley’s Court Rolls, the earliest surviving of which dates to 1284. Nearly one hundred and fifty local people attended, including lots of children. We did paper making, … Continue reading Sally Rodgers, ‘Better Ways in: Using Creative History to Engage New Audiences in Tinsley, South Yorkshire’